Classical Music online - News, events, bios, music & videos on the web.

Classical music and opera by Classissima

Lang Lang

Monday, June 27, 2016


Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 7

Music in Country Churches founder is no more

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc Alan Wilkinson, who founded Music in Country Churches in 1989, has died at the age of 86. An English gentleman of the old school, unfailingly courteous and polite, and backed by a formidable knowledge of music and musicians, over 27 years he arranged an annual series of high class concert weekends in some of the finest English rural churches. Names such as Bartoli, te Kanawa, Brendel, Rostropovich, Zukerman, Perahia, Lang Lang, Marriner, Kissin, Pires and von Otter, together with equally fine orchestras and ensembles, were drawn in by Wilkinson’s charm and persistence, and ensured a loyal and knowledgeable audience, raising along the way well in excess of half a million pounds to support the upkeep of English rural churches. The series will continue, but English music has lost a unique and much-loved figure.

Guardian

June 17

Anatomy Theater's world debut: the goriest opera ever?

New opera from composer David Lang and artist Mark Dion at Los Angeles’s Redcat is set in the days of public autopsies – with a powerfully relevant messageThere is no doubt the opera stage has seen its fair share of blood through the years, whether it be the mad scene in Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor, the ethereal yet obstinate stain soiling Lady Macbeth’s hand, the crimson droplets that portend the end of Mimi in La boheme, or even the corpses of suitors scattered outside the palace of Turandot. But there’s blood and then there’s blood, as so emphatically illustrated by Anatomy Theater, composer David Lang and artist Mark Dion’s new operetta enjoying its world premiere at Los Angeles’s Redcat over five performances beginning 16 June. “There’s this moment in time when people have all these different agendas for why these anatomy lessons are taking place. We thought that would be a really interesting and provocative thing to do,” Lang says of his latest, about the execution of a murderer in 17th century England who is then dissected publicly in order to remove the malignant organs thought to be the impetus for her crime. “What’s exciting to me is through the magic of opera we can dissect this person and she can keep singing. That’s something we can offer that a real anatomy lesson can’t.” Continue reading...




Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

June 3

Want to write a string quartet? Take a hike…

Anthea Kreston, American violinist in the Berlin-based Artemis Quartet, has given up her space this week to the German-speaking Italian composer Eduard Demetz, based in the Alto Adige, who won a competition to write a new work for the group. Anthea asked him to describe the process, first pencil to applause. Here’s what he writes: photo: USP/Teßmann I sit looking at a blank sheet of music on my desk. My hopes are it will be filled in two weeks. I have an idea: I’d like to use the unfinished score of my first string quartet, now 10 years old, and create a new work. I have it here – exactly where I left off. The formal structure still swims in my head – I am ready to pick up from where I was. The idea – a suite-like series of short sections, each individual, with their own texture – each with a different tonal language. I need a lot of completely empty time to accomplish this task. No calendar, no cellphone, no internet. I sit and think for two or three days. Then something begins to move inside of me. Sketches come to me – wherever there is paper or a notepad there are a few notes written down – a few words, sometimes just a graphic or picture drawn. Ideas are rated, ranked – thoughts consolidated. Then, the time in the leather seat begins. The following three things are before me: pencil, sharpener, eraser. The fourth thing is the required time: about 12 weeks. This is a daily discipline – a daily hike. I am now on the plane to Berlin, in my bag is the score of my Broken Islands, that quartet which already resides with each Artemis member in their own home. How will the first meeting go, I wonder. What is it like to work with a world-famous string quartet? We have never met, and before the Artemis Quartet Composition Competition they did not even know of my existence. Islands I bring with me, sound islands, 8 in number. Suddenly I realize that I am seeing everything as an island – as if I have put on a pair of glasses which makes everything into islands. The string quartet genre itself – the king of musical tradition – is itself an island in the musical universe. Further – contemporary music itself is an island which exists inside the archipelago of classical music. I think to myself, as our lives progress, all of us who have been able to emerge ourselves in chamber music each live on our own island. An island of the fortunate. In Berlin I ask the taxi driver for the University of the Arts. He does not know where it is. Just think! Because it is an island! Stop the islands – they revolve around each of us. I arrive at the University of the Arts, looking for an Artemis face that I recognize from the Internet. Suddenly the front door opens and an Artemis face stands before me: Vineta. With a quick eye she scans the hall and with the other she looks at me as if we have know each other for a dozen years. A few days before, she emailed me with a clarifying question about the octave glissandi in the first movement, adding that the Artemis will come to the first Broken Islands rehearsal with a “can-do” attitude. We stand for another second and then make our next move. We head to the cafeteria. Anthea is already sitting there and does not know my English is catastrophic. I look into her lively eyes, and immediately I remember what Gregor told me excitedly on the phone the first thing on the day when Anthea was found after such a long search by the quartet. “She is a wonderful person” he says – and I begin to see how priorities are set in this quartet. When cappuccinos are retrieved, another hand is held out to me – “Hi – I am Ecki”. Again – a feeling that we have known one another for a long time. In some ways this is true – we have long been inside one another’s heads: these four musicians have delved deeply into my quartet (myself), and I have written this piece thinking of them day after day. Gregor cannot come – he is in bed with a fever. Of all of them, I know him best – months of contact by phone or email. We record the rehearsal in entirety for him. Rehearsals are both extensive and intensive. Rhythmically complex sections are balanced and clarified. The teeth of the interlocking gears work perfectly – like clockwork! Oh – and Vineta’s octave glissandi – they appear before me. A compressed 4-second rock concert. And most important – the utmost care to put together the structural and phonetic peculiarities of the score. Like archaeologists – squatting on the ground and with fingertips sweeping the dirt for hidden clues. This takes time and dedication. Time and dedication: that is perhaps one of the secrets of this quartet. I gradually realize that my islands have become independent and no longer need to ask me which way to go. The premiere is up and running: energy, plasticity, sensitivity, subtlety, intensity, momentum. I am happy! A total warm embrace backstage. Gregor is already thinking of the next performance. He tells me: “It will be beautiful!” * Weiße leere Notenblätter liegen vor mir auf dem Schreibtisch. Wetten, dass sie in einigen Wochen voll Noten sind! Ich habe eine Idee: irgendwie lässt mich etwas nicht los, ich möchte bei meinem ersten Streichquartett anknüpfen, das ich vor ungefähr 10 Jahren komponiert habe, und ein neues Streichquartett komponieren. Es soll dort ansetzten, wo ich damals aufgehört habe. Die formale Anlage von damals spukt immer noch in meinem Kopf herum. Ich möchte sie wieder aufgreifen und verbessern. Die Idee ist jene der Suiten-artigen Aneinanderreihung von kurzen Abschnitten, wobei jeder einzelne Teil – bei knapper Tonsprache – seine eigene Textur haben soll. Viel leere Zeit brauche ich, um ein neues Stück beginnen zu können. Zeit ohne Termine, ohne Mobiltelefon, ohne Internet. Zwei / drei Tage lang. Dann beginnt sich in mir etwas zu bewegen. Skizzen entstehen, überall liegen dann Blätter oder Zettel herum, wo ein paar Noten oder ein paar Wörter drauf stehen, manchmal auch graphische Zeichen. Ideen werden geordnet, Gedanken aneinander gereiht. Dann beginnt die Zeit des Sitzleders. Diese Zeit gehört folgenden drei Dingen: Bleistift, Spitzer und Radiergummi. Das Vierte Notwendige ist Zeit: ungefähr 12 Wochen. Es ist wie ein tägliches diszipliniertes Training, eine tägliche Bergtour. Ich sitze im Flugzeug nach Berlin, im Gepäck die Partitur meiner broken islands, jenes Streichquartett, das jedes Artemis-Quartettmitglied schon bei sich zuhause liegen hat. Wie wird die erste Begegnung wohl werden, frag ich mich. Wie ist es, wenn man mit einem der weltweit berühmtesten Streichquartette arbeitet? Wir haben uns noch nie gesehen, und vor dem Artemis-Kompositionswettbewerb wussten die Artemisianer gar nicht von meiner Existenz. Inseln bring ich ihnen mit, Klanginseln, 8 an der Zahl. Plötzlich wird mir bewusst, dass ich nur mehr in Inseln denke, wie wenn ich eine Brille aufgesetzt hätte, die alles als Insel erscheinen lässt. Das Streichquartett als Königsformation der bürgerlichen Musiziertradition ist im musikalischen Universum eine Insel. In diesem Projekt streckt sich diese hinüber in den Bereich der zeitgenössischen Musik, ebenfalls eine Insel. Und überhaupt: wenn ich überlege, was so in den letzten Jahren weltweit passiert ist und immer noch passiert, dann sind wir alle, die wir uns mit Kammermusik beschäftigen (dürfen), eine Insel. Eine Insel derjenigen, die Glück gehabt haben. In Berlin frag ich den Taxifahrer wo die Universität der Künste ist. Er weiß es nicht. Eben! denke ich, weil es eine Insel ist! Schluss mit den Inseln, sie kreisen um sich selbst. In der Universität der Künste eingetroffen warte ich und schaue durch die Gegend, vielleicht gibt es irgendwo ein Artemisgesicht, das ich von den Internetfotos kenne. Plötzlich springt die Tür des Haupteinganges auf und ein Artemisgesicht steht vor mir: Vineta. Mit einem Auge scannt sie die Eingangshalle und mit dem anderen schaut sie mich so an, als würden wir uns schon seit einem Dutzend Jahren kennen. Ein paar Tage vorher hatte sie mich angemailt und mich über Details zu den Oktavenglissandi im ersten Satz gefragt – und hinzugefügt, dass sie zur ersten broken islands-Probe kommen wird um „volle Kanne“ zu spielen. Genau so steht sie jetzt da: volle Kanne! Ungefähr eine Zehntel-Sekunde hat sie gebraucht, um ganz vor mir zu stehen. Ich brauch da etwas länger. Wir gehen in die Cafeterìa. Anthea sitzt schon da und weiß noch nicht, dass mein Englisch katastrophal ist. Ich schaue in ihre quirligen Augen, und sofort fällt mir ein, was Gregor mir am Telefon als Erstes an dem Tag zugejubelt hatte, als Anthea nach langer Artemis-Durststrecke endlich die Vierte im Bunde geworden war: „Sie ist ein wunderbarer Mensch!“ Ich beginne zu verstehen, wie die Prioritäten gesetzt werden. Beim Cappuccino wird mir die nächste Hand entgegengestreckt: hallo ich bin Ecki. Wiederum hab ich das Gefühl, dass wir uns schon seit langer Zeit kennen. Irgendwie müssen wir schon sehr lang im Kopf des jeweils anderen drinnen sein: die vier MusikerInnen in meinem als Interpreten meines Streichquartetts, und ich in ihrem als Komponist des von ihnen ausgelobten Werkes. Gregor wird nicht kommen, sagen sie, er liegt im Bett mit Fieber. Von allen Vieren kenne ich ihn am besten, weil wir in den Monaten davor häufig in Kontakt waren, allerdings nur telefonisch oder per mail. Von dieser ersten Probe wird er trotzdem alles mitbekommen, weil die gesamte Probe aufgenommen wird. Geprobt wird ausgiebig und intensiv. Bei rhythmisch komplexen Stellen wird die Auftaktvergabe reihum durchorganisiert. Manchmal wird das so detailliert abgewickelt wie beim Zähne-zählen von ineinander greifenden Zahnrädern. Und: es funktioniert wie geschmiert! Ach ja, und Vinetas Oktavenglissandi: sie piekt sie heraus und führt sie mir vor. Das klingt wie ein ganzes, auf 4 Sekunden komprimiertes Rock-Konzert. Und das Wichtigste: wie Luchse setzen alle alles daran, um den strukturellen und klanglichen Eigenheiten des Notentextes auf die Schliche zu kommen. Wie Archäologen, die, am Boden hockend, mit den Fingerspitzen die im Erdreich verborgenen Teile freifegen. Das erfordert Zeit und Hingabe. Zeit und Hingabe: das ist vielleicht eines der Erfolgsgeheimnisse dieses Quartetts. Und allmählich merke ich, dass meine Inseln sich verselbständigen und mich nicht mehr fragen, in welche Richtung sie gehen sollen. Die Uraufführung läuft fabelhaft: Energie, Plastizität, Sensibilität, Differenziertheit, Intensität, Schwung. Ich bin happy! Allgemeines herzliches Umarmen Gleich nach der Aufführung hinter der Bühne. Gregor denkt schon an die nächsten Aufführungen und sagt mir: „es wird schön werden“.



Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

May 24

Universal picks radio man as head of US classics

Graham Parker, general manager of New York radio station WQXR, has been appointed president of Universal Music’s classical labels in the US. Graham, 46, ran the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra for almost eight years before taking up the radio job in 2010. British-born, he entered the music industry through an assistant’s job with the New York Philharmonic. His staff are being told about the move at this moment. By some weird PR coincidence, the New York Times ran a soft feature about Graham at the weekend. Press release coming up: SANTA MONICA, May 24, 2016 – Universal Music Group, the world leader in music-based entertainment, today named Graham Parker, General Manager of WQXR, the most-listened to classical music radio station in the U.S. and a 2016 Peabody Award-winner for its Q2Music podcast, as President of its legendary roster of U.S. classical music labels, part of the Verve Label Group. In this new role, Parker will oversee UMG’s U.S. classical music labels including Deutsche Grammophon, Decca Records, Decca Classics, Mercury Classics, and distributed label ECM. Parker will be based in New York and report jointly to Dickon Stainer, President and CEO of Global Classics for Universal Music Group, and Danny Bennett, recently appointed President & CEO of Verve Label Group. To accelerate Universal Music’s classical music strategy, Parker will serve as the U.S. lead for the company’s classical music initiatives to develop and promote emerging classical recording artists and composers on a global scale, working closely with Stainer, David Joseph, Chairman and CEO of Universal Music UK & Ireland and Frank Briegmann, President & CEO Central Europe & Deutsche Grammophon. In close co-ordination with this global team, Parker will develop digital strategies to bring U.S. Universal artists to the widest audiences possible, will deepen relationships with the leading ensembles and venues throughout the U.S., and explore new business opportunities for today’s 21st century artists. While at New York Public Radio, Parker oversaw and implemented ambitious initiatives to serve New York’s thriving classical music scene with new programming, digital offerings, bold community engagement projects, and a robust roster of live events and live broadcasts including performances from Lang Lang to Rufus Wainwright, from its own studios to the stages of Carnegie Hall. Bennett said, “Universal Music is home to some of the world’s finest classical recordings and composers in history, as well as the world’s cutting edge new artists. With Graham, we’re adding an executive who has a proven track record of having his finger on the pulse of classical music and opera and who has made the genre accessible to a whole new audience through groundbreaking programming and digital innovation. I’m looking forward to working with Graham and together making an indelible impact in the world of classical music.” Added Stainer, “I’m delighted to welcome someone of Graham’s stature and visionary approach to help expand classical music’s reach and audience in the U.S. His arrival marks a moment of excitement and opportunity for artists and music fans in America and across the world.” “I’ve devoted my life to classical music and bringing this incredible genre to as wide an audience as possible,” said Parker. “The opportunity to not only join the legendary catalog of Deutsche Grammophon and Decca, but to also be on the forefront of identifying the classical superstars of tomorrow, was too incredible to pass up. I’m humbled by this opportunity and I’m looking forward to working with Danny, Dickon, Michele Anthony and the entire UMG team.”

Classical music and opera by Classissima



[+] More news (Lang Lang)
Jun 20
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 17
Guardian
Jun 16
Topix - Opera
Jun 16
Guardian
Jun 16
Topix - Classical...
Jun 14
Kenneth Woods- A ...
Jun 14
Topix - Opera
Jun 7
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jun 7
Topix - Classical...
Jun 7
Google News AUSTR...
Jun 7
Google News IRELAND
Jun 7
Google News AUSTR...
Jun 7
Google News CANADA
Jun 7
Google News UK
Jun 7
Google News USA
Jun 6
Wordpress Sphere
Jun 3
parterre box
Jun 3
South Florida Cla...
Jun 3
Norman Lebrecht -...
Jun 2
parterre box

Lang Lang




Lang on the web...



Lang Lang »

Great performers

Piano White House Beethoven Chopin Piano Concertos Rachmaninov

Since January 2009, Classissima has simplified access to classical music and enlarged its audience.
With innovative sections, Classissima assists newbies and classical music lovers in their web experience.


Great conductors, Great performers, Great opera singers
 
Great composers of classical music
Bach
Beethoven
Brahms
Debussy
Dvorak
Handel
Mendelsohn
Mozart
Ravel
Schubert
Tchaikovsky
Verdi
Vivaldi
Wagner
[...]


Explore 10 centuries in classical music...